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How does one actually zip their lip?

January 28, 2009

Naked couple go for a stroll

A couple treated open air diners to a 15-minute naked parade in Singapore, triggering both embarrassment and applause for a scene almost unheard of in the conservative city-state.

Pub manager Terence Chia told the Straits Times newspaper he saw the couple taking off their clothes on Saturday night at a staircase in a block of flats in Holland Village, known for its popular nightspots.

“Then, clothes in hand, they coolly walked in their flip-flops towards the market,” he said, adding when the couple did a U-turn a sea of spectators was ready and poised with cameras.

“There were more than 200 people and everyone was taking pictures,” the newspaper on Wednesday quoted Chia as saying. “Even women were busy clicking and people were cheering, whistling and applauding like crazy.”

Police said the couple, a white man and an ethnic Chinese woman in their 20s, had been arrested and released on bail. If convicted under Singapore law, they could face a fine of maximum fine of S$2000 ($1,330), up to 3 months in jail, or both.

Protests are rare in Singapore and only made legal last year in a designated area called “Speakers’ Corner”, modelled on London’s Hyde Park.

“They looked really comfortable walking down the street, which led to many curious stares,” wrote blogger Leonard Tan. “Singapore is getting more and more exciting.”

Defendant smears lawyer in faeces

A mistrial was declared at a court in San Diego after a suspect in a robbery smeared human faeces on his lawyer’s face and then threw more at the jury.

Weusi McGowan, 37, became enraged when Superior Court Judge Jeffrey Fraser refused to remove Deputy Alternate Public Defender Jeffrey Martin from the case.

During the break, McGowan produced a plastic bag with fecal matter and smeared it on Martin’s hair and face. He then flung the bag towards the jury, hitting the brief case of juror No. 9.

 

“That juror didn’t even see it coming,” said prosecutor Christopher Lawson.

After lunch, the judge dismissed the jury and said the defendant would have to find a new lawyer.

McGowan’s bail was raised from $250,000 to $1 million, as he was branded a danger to the community.

The prosecutor said the defendant had wiped human faeces on himself in the past.

McGowan is charged with kidnapping for robbery, assault with a deadly weapon and other counts and could face assault charges in connection with the attack on his lawyer and the jury.

McGowan is accused of hitting a man with a rock in a sock in October 2007.

  I love my past. I love my present. I’m not ashamed of what I’ve had, and I’m not sad because I have it no longer. ~ Colette

Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (28 January 18733 August 1954) French writer, usually known simply by her pen-name “Colette.”

When she raises her eyelids it’s as if she were taking off all her clothes. Claudine and Annie (1903)

My true friends have always given me that supreme proof of devotion, a spontaneous aversion for the man I loved.  Break of Day (1928)

Total absence of humor renders life impossible.  Chance Acquaintances (1952)

1915 – An act of the U.S. Congress creates the United States Coast Guard.

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of seven uniformed services. In addition to being a military branch at all times, it is unique among the armed forces in that it is also a maritime law enforcement agency (with jurisdiction both domestically and in international waters) and a federal regulatory agency. It is an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security during peacetime, and can be transferred to the Department of the Navy by the President during a time of war. The Coast Guard motto is “Semper Paratus“, Latin for “Always Ready” or “Always Prepared”.

As one of the five armed forces and the smallest armed service of the United States, its stated mission is to protect the public, the environment, and the United States economic and security interests in any maritime region in which those interests may be at risk, including international waters and America’s coasts, ports, and inland waterways.

The roots of the Coast Guard lie in the United States Revenue Cutter Service established by Alexander Hamilton under the Department of the Treasury on August 4, 1790. The first USCG station was in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Until the re-establishment of the United States Navy in 1798, the Revenue Cutter Service was the only naval force of the early U.S. It was established to collect taxes from a brand new nation of patriot smugglers. When the officers were out at sea, they were told to crack down on piracy; while they were at it, they might as well rescue anyone in distress.

“First Fleet” is a term occasionally used as an informal reference to the US Coast Guard, although as far as one can detect the United States has never in fact officially used this designation with reference either to the Coast Guard or any element of the US Navy. The informal appellation honors the fact that between 1790 and 1798, there was no United States Navy and the cutters which were the predecessor of the US Coast Guard were the only warships protecting the coast, trade, and maritime interests of the new republic.

The modern Coast Guard can be said to date to 1915, when the Revenue Cutter Service merged with the United States Life-Saving Service and Congress formalized the existence of the new organization. In 1939, the U.S. Lighthouse Service was brought under its purview. In 1942, the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation was transferred to the Coast Guard. In 1967, the Coast Guard moved from the Department of the Treasury to the newly formed Department of Transportation, an arrangement that lasted until it was placed under the Department of Homeland Security in 2002 as part of legislation designed to more efficiently protect American interests following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

In times of war, the Coast Guard or individual components of it can operate as a service of the Department of the Navy. This arrangement has a broad historical basis, as the Guard has been involved in wars as diverse as the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, and the American Civil War, in which the cutter Harriet Lane fired the first naval shots attempting to relieve besieged Fort Sumter. The last time the Coast Guard operated as a whole under the Navy was in World War II. More often, military and combat units within the Coast Guard will operate under Navy operational control while other Coast Guard units will remain under the Department of Homeland Security.

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1986Space Shuttle program: STS-51-L mission (Space Shuttle Challenger disaster) – Space Shuttle Challenger breaks apart after liftoff killing all seven astronauts on board.

Space Shuttle Challenger’s smoke plume after in-flight breakup that killed all seven STS-51-L crew members.

The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster occurred on January 28, 1986 when Challenger, a Space Shuttle operated by NASA, consisting of the Challenger Orbiter, designated OV-099, an External Tank (ET) containing liquid hydrogen fuel and liquid oxygen oxidizer, and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs), broke apart 73 seconds into its flight leading to the deaths of its seven crew members. The spacecraft disintegrated over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of central Florida, United States at 11:39 a.m. EST (16:39 UTC). Disintegration of the shuttle stack began 73 seconds into its flight after an O-ring seal in its right solid rocket booster (SRB) failed at liftoff. The O-ring failure caused a breach in the SRB joint it sealed, allowing a flare (of pressurized hot gas from within the solid rocket motor) to reach the outside and impinge upon the adjacent SRB attachment hardware and external fuel tank. Roughly 73 seconds into the launch, the SRB breach flare led to the separation of the right-hand SRB’s aft attachment and the structural failure of the external tank, dumping the liquid hydrogen fuel load all at once and causing a massive explosion as this fuel was immediately ignited by various present flame sources. Aerodynamic forces promptly broke up the orbiter after this event caused loss of attitude control. The crew compartment and many other vehicle fragments were eventually recovered from the ocean floor after a lengthy search and recovery operation. The crew were probably killed by impact of their crew compartment with the ocean surface, although they might have suffered lethal injuries from the forces of the disintegration.

The disaster resulted in a 32-month hiatus in the shuttle program and the formation of the Rogers Commission, a special commission appointed by United States President Ronald Reagan to investigate the accident. The Rogers Commission found that NASA‘s organizational culture and decision-making processes had been a key contributing factor to the accident. NASA managers had known that contractor Morton Thiokol‘s design of the SRBs contained a potentially catastrophic flaw in the O-rings since 1977, but they failed to address it properly. They also disregarded warnings from engineers about the dangers of launching on such a cold day and had failed to adequately report these technical concerns to their superiors. The Rogers Commission offered NASA nine recommendations that were to be implemented before shuttle flights resumed.

Many viewed the launch live due to the presence on the crew of Christa McAuliffe, the first member of the Teacher in Space Project. Media coverage of the accident was extensive: one study reported that 85 percent of Americans surveyed had heard the news within an hour of the accident. The Challenger disaster has been used as a case study in many discussions of engineering safety and workplace ethics and inspired the 1990 television movie, Challenger.

Barbi Benton (born January 28, 1950 as Barbara Klein). is an American model, actress and singer. She became famous for being the girlfriend of Playboy founder and publisher Hugh Hefner. She is often misperceived as having been a Playboy Playmate since she was featured on the Playboy cover several times.

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